Boundaries

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Boundaries Indicate the beginnings and endings of lines and words.

Types

Characters Meaning
^

Matches beginning of input. If the multiline flag is set to true, also matches immediately after a line break character. For example, /^A/ does not match the "A" in "an A", but does match the first "A" in "An A".

This character has a different meaning when it appears at the start of a group.

$

Matches end of input. If the multiline flag is set to true, also matches immediately before a line break character. For example, /t$/ does not match the "t" in "eater", but does match it in "eat".

\b

Matches a word boundary. This is the position where a word character is not followed or preceded by another word-character, such as between a letter and a space. Note that a matched word boundary is not included in the match. In other words, the length of a matched word boundary is zero.

Examples:
/\bm/ matches the 'm' in "moon" ;
/oo\b/ does not match the 'oo' in "moon", because 'oo' is followed by 'n' which is a word character;
/oon\b/ matches the 'oon' in "moon", because 'oon' is the end of the string, thus not followed by a word character;
/\w\b\w/ will never match anything, because a word character can never be followed by both a non-word and a word character.

To match a backspace character ([\b]), see Character Classes.

\B

Matches a non-word boundary. This is a position where the previous and next character are of the same type: Either both must be words, or both must be non-words. Such as between two letters or between two spaces. The beginning and end of a string are considered non-words. Same as the matched word boundary, the matched non-word boundary is also not included in the match. For example, /\Bon/ matches "on" in "at noon", and /ye\B/ matches "ye" in "possibly yesterday".

Examples

 

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See also

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Contributors to this page: chrisdavidmills, mdnwebdocs-bot, jpmedley
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