To build websites, you should know about HTML — the fundamental technology used to define the structure of a webpage. HTML is used to specify whether your web content should be recognized as a paragraph, list, heading, link, image, multimedia player, form, or one of many other available elements or even a new element that you define.

Learning pathway

Ideally you should start your learning journey by learning HTML. Start by reading Introduction to HTML. You may then move on to learning about more advanced topics such as:

  • HTML5 APIs
  • CSS, and how to use it to style HTML (for example alter your text size and fonts used, add borders and drop shadows, layout your page with multiple columns, add animations and other visual effects.)
  • JavaScript, and how to use it to add dynamic functionality to web pages (for example find your location and plot it on a map, make UI elements appear/disappear when you toggle a button, save users' data locally on their computers, and much much more.)

Before starting this topic, you should have at least basic familiarity with using computers, and using the Web passively (i.e. just looking at it, consuming the content). You should have a basic work environment set up as detailed in Installing basic software, and understand how to create and manage files, as detailed in Dealing with files — both are parts of our Getting started with the web complete beginner's module.

It is recommended that you work through Getting started with the web before attempting this topic, however it isn't absolutely necessary; much of what is covered in the HTML basics article is also covered in our Introduction to HTML module, albeit in a lot more detail.

Modules

This topic contains the following modules, in a suggested order for working through them. You should definitely start with the first one.

Introduction to HTML
This module sets the stage, getting you used to important concepts and syntax, looking at applying HTML to text, how to create hyperlinks, and how to use HTML to structure a webpage.
Multimedia and embedding
This module explores how to use HTML to include multimedia in your web pages, including the different ways that images can be included, and how to embed video, audio, and even entire other webpages.
Forms and buttons (TBD)
Forms and buttons are a very important part of the Web — these allow your site visitors to input data and send it to you (e.g. registration, login and feedback forms), and you to implement controls for controlling complex functionality (for example submitting a form to the server, or pausing playback of a video.) This module gets you started.
Tables (TBD)
Representing tabular data on a webpage in an understandable, accessible way can be a challenge. This module covers basic table markup, along with more complex features such as implementing captions and summaries.

Solving common HTML problems

Use HTML to solve common problems provides links to sections of content explaining how to use HTML to solve very common problems when creating a webpage: dealing with titles, adding images or videos, emphasizing content, creating a basic form, etc.

See also

HTML (HyperText Markup Language) on MDN.
The main entry point for HTML documentation on MDN, from detailed element references to advanced tutorials.
HTML reference
A comprehensive reference guide to all the many features of the HTML language — if you want to know what attributes an element has, or what values an attribute has, for example, this is a great place to start.
HTML developer guide
More advanced guides and tutorials from the MDN HTML section.

Document Tags and Contributors

 Last updated by: jdescottes,