Contributing to MDN

MDN Web Docs needs your help! We have a large number of typos to fix, examples to write, bugs to fix, people to talk to, and more, and the number is growing as more people start using the site. This page outlines what you can do to help.

Note

If you haven't contributed to MDN previously, the Getting Started guide explains the process in four simple steps. Good news, you're already on step 3: "Finding out how you can help"!

What can I do to help?

There are multiple avenues you can take to contribute to MDN depending on your skillset and interests. Along with each task we provide a short description and an approximate time that each type of task typically takes.

If you are not sure what to do, you are always welcome to ask for help.

Primary contribution types

The links in this section lead to detailed guides explaining how to do a particular contribution task that we are most interested in getting community help with, either because they are a critical function, and/or because they have a large backlog associated with them. Please consider helping out with these tasks before you consider contributing in other ways.

Tasks Description Skillset required
Fixing MDN content bugs Our content repo is where people submit issues to report problems found with MDN docs (you'll also find some bugs to fix at the older sprints repo, but we'll be closing it down eventually). We get a lot of content bugs, and any help you can give in fixing them would be much appreciated.
  • Knowledge of the web technologies you choose to help with (e.g. JavaScript, CSS).
  • A reasonable understanding of the English language (don't worry if your English is not perfect; we can help you with it). 
Reviewing MDN edits People submit pull requests on our content repo all the time to update MDN content, and we need help reviewing them. Head over to our REVIEWING.md page to find out how the reviewing process works, and how you can get involved.
  • Knowledge of the web technologies you choose to help with (e.g. JavaScript, CSS).
  • A reasonable understanding of the English language (don't worry if your English is not perfect; we can help you with it). 
Help beginners to learn on MDN Our Learn web development pages get over a million views per month and have active forums where people go to ask for general help, or request that their assessments be marked. We’d love some help with answering posts and growing our learning community.
  • Knowledge of the web technologies you choose to help with (e.g. JavaScript, CSS).
  • Enthusiasm for explaining technical topics and helping beginners learn to code.
  • Reasonable proficiency with the English language; it really doesn't need to be perfect.

We will add more tasks here as time goes on.

Other task types

If our main priorities listed above don't interest you, you can find a number of other, more general task types to get involved with below, split up by skillset.

If you are more interested in words, you could do the following:

If you are more interested in code, you could try your hand at the following:

If you are interested in words and code, you could try your hand at the following:

Note: If you have found something that is incorrect on MDN but you're not sure how to fix it, you can report problems by filing a documentation issue. Please give the issue a descriptive title. (It's not helpful to say "Dead link" without saying where you found the link.

Other useful pages

Documentation processes
The MDN documentation project is enormous; there are a vast number of technologies we cover through the assistance of hundreds of contributors from across the world. To help us bring order to chaos, we have standard processes to follow when working on specific documentation-related tasks. Here you'll find guides to those processes.
Fixing MDN content bugs
Problems with MDN docs are reported as content repo issues (and there are still some open issues in the legacy sprints repo). This article helps you find the best issues to work on, based on your expertise and how much time you have available, and outlines the main steps to fixing them.
Getting started on MDN
We are an open community of developers building resources for a better Web, regardless of brand, browser, or platform. Anyone can contribute and each person who does makes us stronger. Together we can continue to drive innovation on the Web to serve the greater good. It starts here, with you.
GitHub best practices
This page is a set of best practices for working with GitHub, which are useful when contributing to many different task types on MDN.
Help beginners to learn on MDN!
Our Learn web development pages get over a million views per month, and have active forums where people go to ask for general help, or request that their assessments be marked. We’d love some help with answering posts, and growing our learning community.
Localizing MDN
Since December 14th 2020, MDN has been running on the new GitHub-based Yari platform. This has a lot of advantages for MDN, but we've needed to make radical changes to the way in which we handle localization. This is because we've ended up with a lot of unmaintained and out-of-date content in our non-en-US locales, and we want to manage it better in the future.
MDN contribution changelog
This document provides a record of MDN content processes, constructs, and best practices that have changed, and when they changed. It is useful to allow regular contributors to check in and see what has changed about the process of creating content for MDN.
MDN web docs: How-to guides
These articles provide step-by-step guides to accomplishing specific goals when contributing to MDN.
Send feedback about MDN Web Docs
If you have suggestions for, or are having problems using the MDN Web Docs, this is the right place to be. The very fact that you're interested in offering feedback makes you even more a part of the Mozilla community, and we thank you in advance for your interest.