mozilla

Compare Revisions

Sameness in JavaScript

Change Revisions

Revision 560739:

Revision 560739 by Sevenspade on

Revision 560803:

Revision 560803 by Sevenspade on

Title:
Sameness in JavaScript
Sameness in JavaScript
Slug:
Web/JavaScript/Guide/Sameness
Web/JavaScript/Guide/Sameness
Tags:
"Guide", "Operators", "Advanced", "JavaScript"
"Guide", "Operators", "Advanced", "JavaScript"
Content:

Revision 560739
Revision 560803
t54      Prior to ES6, you might have said of double equals and tript54      Prior to ES6, you might have said of double equals and trip
>le equals that one is an "enhanced" version of the other. For exa>le equals that one is an "enhanced" version of the other. For exa
>mple, someone might say that double equals is an extended version>mple, someone might say that double equals is an extended version
> of triple equals, because the former does everything that the la> of triple equals, because the former does everything that the la
>tter does, but with type conversion on its operands (e.g., so tha>tter does, but with type conversion on its operands. E.g., <code>
>t <code>6 == "6"</code>). Alternatively, someone might say that t>6 == "6"</code>. (Alternatively, someone might say that double eq
>riple equals is an enhanced version of double equals, because it >uals is the baseline, and triple equals is an enhanced version, b
>requires the two operands to be the same type. Which one is bette>ecause it requires the two operands to be the same type, so it ad
>r depends on one's idea of which is the baseline.>ds an extra constraint. Which one is the better model for underst
 >anding depends on how you choose to view things.)

Back to History