Compare Revisions

A re-introduction to JavaScript (JS tutorial)

Change Revisions

Revision 18648:

Revision 18648 by raleighr on

Revision 18649:

Revision 18649 by Sarabjot on

Title:
A re-introduction to JavaScript (JS Tutorial)
A re-introduction to JavaScript (JS Tutorial)
Slug:
JavaScript/A_re-introduction_to_JavaScript
JavaScript/A_re-introduction_to_JavaScript
Tags:
javascript
javascript
Content:

Revision 18648
Revision 18649
nn163    <p>
164      You can test for <code>Infinity</code>, <code>-Infinity</co
 >de> and <code>NaN</code> using the <code><a href="/en/JavaScript/
 >Reference/Global_Objects/isFinite" title="en/Core_JavaScript_1.5_
 >Reference/Global_Functions/isFinite">isFinite()</a></code> functi
 >on:
165    </p>
166    <pre class="brush: js">
167&gt; isFinite(1/0)
168false
169&gt; isFinite(-Infinite)
170false
171&gt; isFinite(NaN)
172false
173&gt; isFinite('string value')
174false
175</pre>
n792      There's something here we haven't seen before: the '<code><n805      There's something here we haven't seen before: the '<code><
>a href="/en/JavaScript/Reference/Operators/Special/this" title="e>a href="/en/JavaScript/Reference/Operators/this" title="en/Core_J
>n/Core_JavaScript_1.5_Reference/Operators/Special_Operators/this_>avaScript_1.5_Reference/Operators/Special_Operators/this_Operator
>Operator">this</a></code>' keyword. Used inside a function, '<cod>">this</a></code>' keyword. Used inside a function, '<code>this</
>e>this</code>' refers to the current object. What that actually m>code>' refers to the current object. What that actually means is 
>eans is specified by the way in which you called that function. I>specified by the way in which you called that function. If you ca
>f you called it using <a href="/en/JavaScript/Reference/Operators>lled it using <a href="/en/JavaScript/Reference/Operators/Member_
>/Member_Operators" title="en/Core_JavaScript_1.5_Reference/Operat>Operators" title="en/Core_JavaScript_1.5_Reference/Operators/Memb
>ors/Member_Operators">dot notation or bracket notation</a> on an >er_Operators">dot notation or bracket notation</a> on an object, 
>object, that object becomes '<code>this</code>'. If dot notation >that object becomes '<code>this</code>'. If dot notation wasn't u
>wasn't used for the call, '<code>this</code>' refers to the globa>sed for the call, '<code>this</code>' refers to the global object
>l object. This is a frequent cause of mistakes. For example:>. This is a frequent cause of mistakes. For example:
t820      We've introduced another keyword: '<code><a href="/en/JavaSt833      We've introduced another keyword: '<code><a href="/en/JavaS
>cript/Reference/Operators/Special/new" title="en/Core_JavaScript_>cript/Reference/Operators/new" title="en/Core_JavaScript_1.5_Refe
>1.5_Reference/Operators/Special_Operators/new_Operator">new</a></>rence/Operators/Special_Operators/new_Operator">new</a></code>'. 
>code>'. <code>new</code> is strongly related to '<code>this</code><code>new</code> is strongly related to '<code>this</code>'. What
>>'. What it does is it creates a brand new empty object, and then> it does is it creates a brand new empty object, and then calls t
> calls the function specified, with '<code>this</code>' set to th>he function specified, with '<code>this</code>' set to that new o
>at new object. Functions that are designed to be called by '<code>bject. Functions that are designed to be called by '<code>new</co
>>new</code>' are called constructor functions. Common practise is>de>' are called constructor functions. Common practise is to capi
> to capitalise these functions as a reminder to call them with <c>talise these functions as a reminder to call them with <code>new<
>ode>new</code>.>/code>.

Back to History