mozilla

Compare Revisions

The stacking context

Change Revisions

Revision 46798:

Revision 46798 by Rod Whiteley on

Revision 46799:

Revision 46799 by Rod Whiteley on

Title:
The stacking context
The stacking context
Slug:
CSS/Understanding_z-index/The_stacking_context
CSS/Understanding_z-index/The_stacking_context
Tags:
css, Understanding_CSS_z-index
css, Understanding_CSS_z-index
Content:

Revision 46798
Revision 46799
n14      Under certain conditions, a child stacking context can be cn14      Under certain conditions, a child stacking context can be c
>reated within a DIV (or in another HTML element) anywhere in the >reated within a DIV (or in another element) anywhere in the docum
>document. In particular, an HTML element that is positioned (abso>ent. In particular, an element that is positioned (absolutely or 
>lutely or relatively) and has a z-index value that is nonzero (or>relatively) and has a z-index value that is nonzero (or auto), cr
> auto), creates its own stacking context: All its descendant elem>eates its own stacking context: All its child elements are stacke
>ents are stacked within the parent element following the same rul>d entirely within that context, following the same rules previous
>es previously explained. It is important to say that each stackin>ly explained. The z-index values of its child elements only have 
>g context is atomic and independent from the parent's stacking co>meaning in that context. The entire DIV and its contents are stac
>ntext. z-index values of elements contained in the child stacking>ked as a single element in the parent stacking context.
> context are valid only in that context. Once rendered, the whole 
> element is atomically stacked in the parent stacking context. 
t26      <li>Each stacking context is atomic: once stacking and rendt26      <li>Each stacking context is self-contained: after the elem
>ering is complete, the whole element is considered in the stackin>ent's contents are stacked, the whole element is considered in th
>g order of the parent stacking context.>e stacking order of the parent stacking context.

Back to History