mozilla

Compare Revisions

Text-rendering

Change Revisions

Revision 138621:

Revision 138621 by SirNicholasIII on

Revision 138622:

Revision 138622 by Athula on

Title:
Text-rendering
Text-rendering
Slug:
Talk:CSS/Text-rendering
Talk:CSS/Text-rendering
Content:

Revision 138621
Revision 138622
tt16    <p>
17      This is Athula:
18    </p>
19    <p>
20      In short, you can use it in HTML by using the SVG directive
 > as a CSS directive, as here:
21    </p>
22    <p>
23      <code>&lt;body style="font-family: Calibri, sans serif; tex
 >t-rendering: optimizeLegibility;"&gt;</code>
24    </p>
25    <p>
26      But, you shouldn't have to do it. Mozilla did not understan
 >d it well.
27    </p>
28    <p>
29      I am familiar with the way Latin fonts are rendered. First 
 >understand that basic glyphs are located at Unicode codepoint pos
 >itions inside the font. Then some fonts have what are called 'fea
 >tures'. The most common of these features is called &lt;liga&gt;.
 > When a font supports &lt;liga&gt; feature, it has lookup tables 
 >that point to ligatures constructed out of several letters. Ligat
 >ures are 'glued together' letters typically, f+f, f+i, f+l, f+f+i
 > and f+f+l (ff, fi, fl, ffi and ffl). Since no Unicode codepoints
 > exist for these, the font foundry places their glyphs in locatio
 >ns in the area called Private Use Area, which are unassigned Unic
 >ode codepoints.
30    </p>
31    <p>
32      Now, if optimizeLegibility is set, the application allows t
 >he font to offer the ligatures as you type. For instance, if you 
 >type 'i' soon after typing 'f', the font replaces the 'f' already
 > typed with 'fi' ligature. (Try this inside Notepad on Vista with
 > Calibri font. You'll be able to move the cursor into the ligatur
 >e!). As you could imagine, this process happens in microseconds (
 >perhaps nanoseconds) in the main memory of the computer. There is
 > no humanly discernible speed difference between rendering 'f' an
 >d then 'i' and rendering 'f' and then replacing it with 'fi'. Cal
 >ibri has 5 ligatures. We tried this with a font that has 400 plus
 > ligatures some using 3rd level lookups. This page is on the web 
 >for anyone to try. It has thousands of ligatures completely trans
 >forming a transliterated Indic language into its complex form sim
 >ply via ligatures.
33    </p>
34    <p>
35      OpenType standard recommends &lt;liga&gt; to be enabled by 
 >default for all scripts because non-Latin fonts use this feature 
 >extensively. However, Mozilla decided to make it optional for fon
 >t sizes below 20px making it useless as you discovered. It is an 
 >unfortunate misunderstanding of how fonts are constructed and, of
 > course, the OpenType standard.
36    </p>

Back to History