Compare Revisions

Interpreting specifications

Change Revisions

Revision 484581:

Revision 484581 by Ms2ger on

Revision 518755:

Revision 518755 by TatumCreative on

Title:
Interpreting specifications
Interpreting specifications
Slug:
Project:MDN/Contributing/Interpreting_specifications
Project:MDN/Contributing/Interpreting_specifications
Content:

Revision 484581
Revision 518755
n8      When writing technical documentation about Web technologiesn8      When writing technical documentation about Web technologies
>, one thing you'll find yourself doing regularly is reading speci>, one thing you'll find yourself doing regularly is reading speci
>fications. There are hundreds of them describing technologies for>fications. There are hundreds of them describing technologies for
> the Web, written by a great many different people and organizati> the Web, written by a great many different people and organizati
>ons. Being able to make sense of them is important, and this arti>ons. Being able to make sense of them is important, and this arti
>cle will attempt to help you do just that.>cle will attempt to help you do just that. Be aware that there ar
 >e many sites that create help documents that interpret the standa
 >rds (correctly or incorrectly), but there should be a single cano
 >nical specification that should be referred to when writing docum
 >entation.
t14      <<information about where specs live on the Web, whict14      The primary organization responsible for the World Wide Web
>h are "official", etc. also, how do you know when a spec is "done> standards is the <a href="http://www.w3.org/TR/">World Wide Web 
> enough" to start writing about?&gt;&gt;>Consortium</a> or W3C for short. The list of standards and drafts
 > through the W3C can be <a href="http://www.w3.org/TR/">found on 
 >the w3.org website</a>. This is a useful starting place for resea
 >rching the accepted specifications for various web technologies. 
 >Take into account when accessing the standards that they can be a
 > work in progress and have changing details according to their le
 >vel of maturation. These levels for the W3C are officially define
 >d as Working Draft, Candidate Recommendation, Proposed Recommenda
 >tion, and W3C Recommendation. The more solid a specification, the
 > further down the former list it will be. As the specifications d
 >evelop, browsers will typically have more solid support for the f
 >eature-sets. However,&nbsp;<span style="line-height: 1.5;">specif
 >ic browsers do not always adhere to the specifications as they ar
 >e laid out, and can have different levels of support.</span>
15    </p>
16    <p>
17      There can be other specification groups online to be aware 
 >of. For instance <a href="http://khronos.org/registry/webgl/specs
 >/1.0/">WebGL</a> is being developed and maintained by the <a href
 >="https://www.khronos.org/">Khronos Group</a>.
18    </p>
19    <p>
20      &lt;&lt;how do you know when a spec is "done enough" to sta
 >rt writing about? are there other spec groups to add?&gt;&gt;

Back to History