Structure of an installable bundle

  • Revision slug: Bundles
  • Revision title: Structure of an installable bundle
  • Revision id: 72284
  • Created:
  • Creator: Benjamin Smedberg
  • Is current revision? No
  • Comment /* Application-specific Extension Files */

Revision Content

XULRunner applications, extensions, and themes all share a common directory structure, and in some cases the same bundle can be used as a standalone XULRunner application as well as an installable application extension. The basic structure of bundles may include any of the following files:

/install.rdf                        Extension/Theme Install Manifest
/application.ini                    Application Launch Manifest
/components/*                       Component and XPT Files      (>=1.7)
/defaults/preferences/*.js          Default Preferences          (>=1.7)
/plugins/*                          NPAPI Plugins                (>=1.8)
/chrome.manifest                    Chrome Registration Manifest (>=1.8)
/chrome/icons/default/*             Window Icons                 (>=1.8)

Of course, an extension need not (and normally won't) have all of these directories. Themes are limited for security reasons, and can normally only provide a chrome.manifest which registers the theme and a JAR file.


Platform-specific Subdirectories

In some cases a single extension or application may wish to include binary component or plugins for multiple platforms, or theme authors might want to include multiple platform-specific JAR files. To facilitate the first case, the extension/app loader has special sub-directories specifically for platform-specific files (starting with Toolkit/Gecko 1.8, Firefox/Thunderbird 1.5). The platform string is defined during the toolkit build process to a value unique for the combination of operating system, processor architecture and compiler. The format of the platform string is:

{OS_TARGET}_{TARGET_XPCOM_ABI}

All of the files which are loaded from the main extension directory are loaded from the subdirectory

/platform/{platform string}

if it exists. For example, if a plugin vendor wanted to make a plugin available for consumer computers running Linux, Macintosh, and Windows, it would provide the following files:

/platform/Linux_x86-gcc3/plugins/libMyPlugin.so
/platform/WINNT_x86-msvc/plugins/MyPlugin.dll
/platform/Darwin_ppc-gcc3/plugins/libMyPlugin.dylib

Because XPT files are not platform-specific, any associated XPT files would go in the generic components directory:

/components/MyPlugin.xpt

If an extension has non-binary platform-specific code (such as code which uses the windows registry from script), it can also use just the operating system identifier as a platform-subdirectory:

/platform/WINNT/components/registerDoctype.js

When platform-specific JAR files are used, each platform directory should have its own chrome.manifest file:

chrome.manifest
chrome/mytheme-base.jar
platform/Darwin/chrome.manifest
platform/Darwin/chrome/mytheme-mac.jar
platform/WINNT/chrome.manifest
platform/WINNT/chrome/mytheme-win.jar

The app/extension loader processes the base directory first, followed by the applicable platform directories (first /{OS_TARGET}/, then /{OS_TARGET}_{TARGET_XPCOM_ABI}/). When default preferences are defined in several directories, the ones loaded later overwrite the earlier ones.

Application-specific Extension Files

In addition to the extension files listed above, applications may read additional files from extensions. For example, Firefox 1.5 and greater will read Sherlock search plugins from

/searchplugins/*.src

Firefox 2 and greater will additionally read MozSearch and OpenSearch plugins from

/searchplugins/*.xml

and Myspell dictionaries from

/dictionaries/*.{aff|dic}

Official References for Toolkit API

{{wiki.template(':en/Toolkit_API/Official_References')}}

{{ wiki.languages( { "fr": "fr/Bundles" } ) }}

Revision Source

<p> 
</p><p><a href="en/XUL_Application_Packaging">XULRunner applications</a>, <a href="en/Extensions">extensions</a>, and <a href="en/Themes">themes</a> all share a common directory structure, and in some cases the same bundle can be used as a standalone XULRunner application as well as an installable application extension. The basic structure of bundles may include any of the following files:
</p>
<pre class="eval">/<a href="en/Install.rdf">install.rdf</a>                        <i>Extension/Theme Install Manifest</i>
/<a href="en/XUL_Application_Packaging">application.ini</a>                    <i>Application Launch Manifest</i>
/components/*                       <i>Component and XPT Files</i>      (&gt;=1.7)
<a href="en/Building_an_Extension#Defaults_Files">/defaults/preferences/*.js</a>          <i>Default Preferences</i>          (&gt;=1.7)
/plugins/*                          <i>NPAPI Plugins</i>                (&gt;=1.8)
/<a href="en/Chrome.manifest">chrome.manifest</a>                    <i>Chrome Registration Manifest</i> (&gt;=1.8)
/<a href="en/Window_icons">chrome/icons/default/*</a>             <i>Window Icons</i>                 (&gt;=1.8)
</pre>
<p>Of course, an extension need not (and normally won't) have all of these directories. Themes are limited for security reasons, and can normally only provide a <a href="en/Chrome.manifest">chrome.manifest</a> which registers the theme and a JAR file.
</p><p><br>
</p>
<h3 name="Platform-specific_Subdirectories"> Platform-specific Subdirectories </h3>
<p>In some cases a single extension or application may wish to include binary component or plugins for multiple platforms, or theme authors might want to include multiple platform-specific JAR files. To facilitate the first case, the extension/app loader has special sub-directories specifically for platform-specific files (starting with Toolkit/Gecko 1.8, Firefox/Thunderbird 1.5). The platform string is defined during the toolkit build process to a value unique for the combination of operating system, processor architecture and compiler. The format of the platform string is:
</p>
<pre class="eval"><i>{OS_TARGET}</i>_<i>{<a href="en/XPCOM_ABI">TARGET_XPCOM_ABI</a>}</i>
</pre>
<p>All of the files which are loaded from the main extension directory are loaded from the subdirectory
</p>
<pre class="eval">/platform/<i>{platform string}</i>
</pre>
<p>if it exists. For example, if a plugin vendor wanted to make a plugin available for consumer computers running Linux, Macintosh, and Windows, it would provide the following files:
</p>
<pre class="eval">/platform/Linux_x86-gcc3/plugins/libMyPlugin.so
/platform/WINNT_x86-msvc/plugins/MyPlugin.dll
/platform/Darwin_ppc-gcc3/plugins/libMyPlugin.dylib
</pre>
<p>Because XPT files are not platform-specific, any associated XPT files would go in the generic components directory:
</p>
<pre class="eval">/components/MyPlugin.xpt
</pre>
<p>If an extension has non-binary platform-specific code (such as code which uses the windows registry from script), it can also use just the operating system identifier as a platform-subdirectory:
</p>
<pre class="eval">/platform/WINNT/components/registerDoctype.js
</pre>
<p>When platform-specific JAR files are used, each platform directory should have its own <code>chrome.manifest</code> file:
</p>
<pre class="eval">chrome.manifest
chrome/mytheme-base.jar
platform/Darwin/chrome.manifest
platform/Darwin/chrome/mytheme-mac.jar
platform/WINNT/chrome.manifest
platform/WINNT/chrome/mytheme-win.jar
</pre>
<p>The app/extension loader processes the base directory first, followed by the applicable platform directories (first /{OS_TARGET}/, then /{OS_TARGET}_{<a href="en/XPCOM_ABI">TARGET_XPCOM_ABI</a>}/). When default preferences are defined in several directories, the ones loaded later overwrite the earlier ones.
</p>
<h3 name="Application-specific_Extension_Files"> Application-specific Extension Files </h3>
<p>In addition to the extension files listed above, applications may read additional files from extensions. For example, <a href="en/Firefox_1.5">Firefox 1.5</a> and greater will read Sherlock search plugins from
</p>
<pre class="eval">/searchplugins/*.src
</pre>
<p><a href="en/Firefox_2">Firefox 2</a> and greater will additionally read <a href="en/Creating_MozSearch_plugins">MozSearch and OpenSearch plugins</a> from
</p>
<pre class="eval">/searchplugins/*.xml
</pre>
<p>and Myspell dictionaries from
</p>
<pre class="eval">/dictionaries/*.{aff|dic}
</pre>
<h3 name="Official_References_for_Toolkit_API"> Official References for <a href="en/Toolkit_API">Toolkit API</a> </h3>
<p>{{wiki.template(':en/Toolkit_API/Official_References')}}
</p>{{ wiki.languages( { "fr": "fr/Bundles" } ) }}
Revert to this revision